Sailing Yacht

S/V Southern Cross Ep.one – What makes a True Bluewater Sailboat





Beginning to break down the unique parts of a sailboat to establish what makes a bluewater sailboat.

These are my Opinions I have fashioned above decades of investigation and talking with sailors who have circumnavigated or put in prolonged time sailing offshore. Compiling info from books, publications, on-line investigation, stepping on quite a few unique type and course of sailboats and first hand conversations about the boats utilised and classes discovered by the true sailors.

Black and white photo is of Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton and a tiny portion of the crew of the Stamina as they established off on an 800 mile voyage across the Southern Ocean in a 22ft existence-raft

41 comments

  1. Hi,

    We are now looking for our first boat. You mentioned C&C in your video. What didn't you like about these boats? I know there is a lot of debate about cored hulls, but you are quite practical and I like your simplistic down to earth explanations.

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  2. Can't wait to watch the rest.

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  3. Having lived aboard for 15 years, I've been there, done this, so he's my dos centavos. Fin keel v full keel. Having lived on both I'm in the middle. My spade rudder snapped clean off, so I prefer a skeg mount with a modified fin. It gives me a bit less draft and tracks better than a fin. I'm a big fan of a raised deck. You get a bit more windage, but you have a nice clean, open deck that stays drier longer. Exterior chain plates. Deck mounted will leak and soak the deck core. Keel stepped mast v deck stepped? I prefer deck stepped. I don't need another hole in the roof. If something were to happen to the rig it won't compromise the cabin. Rig? I prefer a cutter. I've sailed a ketch under staysail and mizzen in heavy air and it was nice, but I don't need another stick to mess with. It can be a pain to tack the jib, but with the staysail on a boom you don't have to mess with sheets much. Wheel v tiller. Always had a tiller, but it's not a preference, it came with the boat. Down below. A double berth, not a v-berth. Propane cooking. Everything low tech. Head aft doubles as a wet locker. Adequate storage, of course. Gear? Matched electronics so everything talks to everything else. Electric winches? I'm on the fence here. Again, I prefer it low tech, but hauling a hundred feet of chain aboard by hand is something I'd prefer not to do. My last big preference is for solar panels. Just a couple. Wind power, again, is prone to breakage. That's it for now. I'm sure I'll have more to add in future segments.

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  4. thanks for your time, much apriciated man, from venezuela respect

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  5. Hi,

    I just wondered how the level of fresh water is measured. I ask because although there’s not much rain around Caribbean when it does fall you can easily fill a water tank in maybe 30 minutes.
    I have started following another sailing boat with a couple on it and they were dry for 6 weeks, then got one hell of a downpour that filled both their freshwater tanks in less the an hour.
    What I mean to say is how can you monitor the water directed into your tanks from rain without actually sitting there and watching it over-flow?

    As you might guess I am a wannabe southern sailor and an invalid, so am not physically able to do the sailing thing like you, and am interested in what and how and why’s of doing so? > ? > ?

    Take care seriously,
    mrbluenun

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  6. Hi,

    I like what you broadcast, thanks. The stuff I hear sounds really interesting and I wi check out your channels out from number 1 .

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  7. Would I be able to take a 28.5 or 29.5 hunter sailboat and turn it into a Bluewater cruiser? I want a sailboat under 30 ft that can go from Florida to the Caribbean like the virgin islands and then maybe one day go thru the panama canal and go to Hawaii to Australia and then turn around and come back to Hawaii and the panama canal and back to Florida! If not I would just like to be able to sail to the Caribbean and virgin islands from Florida keys mainly staying in the gulf of mexico and Caribbean sea near the islands and coast!

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  8. Sorry. Oday 39

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  9. Ah maybe I missed it. What kind of boat do you have.

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  10. After certain design criteria have been met and production boats will be classed for purpose in order for insurance. If your boat is found suitable for open water they it can be MADE into a blue water cruisier by a safe and knowledgeable sailor. Many large racing sailboats have broken in half crossing oceans and the jester challenge has sailors crossing the north atlantic in very small boats made suitable

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  11. where do the dogs go potty when your at sea?

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  12. I've watched this and can only assume it's pitched at people who have never sailed or someone who has sat in a boat once (in the dark)…and then forgot about the experience. I think this vid would be improved if big bird was dispensing the pearls of wisdom rather than the shagged Rrussel Crowe lookalike.

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  13. The Pacific Seacraft 37, designed by W.B. Crealock, is a great bluewater cruiser. Here's a description:
    https://pacificseacraft37.com/overview/

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  14. Subbed.
    I'll ask you what I have asked a few other people who sail.
    In regards to water, I know water makers & strainers are expensive. So why not use an evaporator/dehumidifier or 2? Pull the moisture out of the air tube it through a filter & into the holding tank. I have asked a few guys & they just kind of shrugged & said, "I don't know".

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  15. subscribed, liked, now commenting lol

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  16. I've been looking at Boats & this Video made me subscribe, you have covered several of my questions, cant wait to dive into your Vid's, Thanks for posting!

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  17. What is the make and model of Southern Cross?

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  18. A true blue water sailboat needs wind vane steering 😉

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  19. Man, was looking for exactly something like this. great vid, keep it up!

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  20. Whatever Lamar Odom needed. Least 50 feet and a doctor onboard. and some Roy Rogers chicken.

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  21. where is southern cross located?

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  22. Yup , for the most part it's all preference . PDQ36 with outboards

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  23. Cool, wanting  a boat to live on and sail the world in a few years. definitely gonna keep up on this channel.

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  24. Good common sense, looking forwad to following the videos. cheers.

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  25. Great start to a series, I unfortunately started back into sailing by buying a rebuild boat that wound up needing way too much work(my fault) but when she's finished I'll know every cubic inch. I'll definitely be watching the rest of your series. Thanks

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  26. I just finished watching the first two episodes. I love it. I have been retired since 2005 from the Army Reserves and since 2008 from my civilian police job. Since then, I ended up going to college and getting a bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering. During my years in school, I often thought about heading South from rural NY state and considered getting my own boat for sailing as well as living aboard. I have no sailing experience other than a few laps on a fresh water lake when I was a kid in a small Sunfish sailboat in the mid 1970's. I see a move in my near future to Florida and I will be taking some formal instruction for sailing and navigation. Electronics are awesome but I would still like to learn to navigate the old fashioned way using a sextant, compass and real paper charts. At least then if the electrical system goes down, I can still manage basic navigation.

    My plan would be to use the boat for international travel, Caribbean cruising, trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific crossings, sailing in and around the Philippines (that is where my wife is from) and perhaps even live on it permanently outside the USA. Like you, I to have done a lot of reading and discovered there are many things to consider. I really like the idea of having a Catamaran 38'-42' long with a beam of at least 16'. I will most likely be financially restricted to a mono-hull sailboat between 32'-45' in length with a minimum of 11' beam. I will of course be looking for the most bang for my buck such as water maker, solar panels, charge controller, large battery bank, wind generator, fairly new electronics, good sails etc. Sorry to ramble on. I am looking forward to checking out the rest of your videos. May God be with you in your travels and thank you so much for sharing.

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  27. Heh heh… You look like Reiley from LaVagabond will look like in 20 years.

    Sub'd and liked.

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  28. First Video of your channel I watched, I am definitely going to watch the whole series! You seem like you know a lot and it's just chilled to listen to you! Love it.

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  29. I am subscribed. I am just starting my training this spring. Which classes should I take? ASA101? ASA103? Coastal and Caribbean cruising

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  30. Again enjoyed your discussion and look forward to the other videos.

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  31. Having learned to sail over 20 years ago, I have sailed a few different types of boats. Since retiring from the Corps, I have sailed the MAC 10 times, and have done mostly day sailing and a few overnighters on Lake Michigan. Now that I have hung-up my racing hat, I am looking at doing some cruising. Now for the last couple of years, I have been looking at what boat I want. So the question I have is, Why have you chosen a monohull versus a cat type boat? This is where I am at trying to decide which way to go. I have been looking at both. Thanks for your time.

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  32. I like that we are discussing this on youtube, it's good for those of us who are visual learners.

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  33. I guess you're just aiming for the American market, as you mention just American boats. There is Moody, Najad, Hallberg Rassy, Westerly, Oyster, Malö to name a few in the European market… The rest of what you say is of course the same on the above mentioned boats, steering, stowage, chain plates, spreaders etc…
    Warren

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  34. Ahoy Southern Cross. Got to video #5 and decided each video up to then was very, very informative, even to a sailor. Came back to video #1 to subscribe and went back to all the others to give a "Thumbs Up". I know these minor efforts on the viewers part does a lot for you and hope ALL viewers will do the same for you. The information you've passed on is worth far more than our clicking a couple buttons.

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  35. Looking forward to your views.

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  36. Sounds like you've a sensible approach to blue water 🙂 Looking forward to the rest of the series!

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  37. Awesome! Looking forward to these videos!

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  38. what do you think about power as in consumption vs generation how will you tackle that in a bluewater sailing vessel?

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  39. Gday Mate, Ive been thinking about exactly what you are doing, only just started looking and reckon im gonna go for aluminium yacht. What do you think about them? Great show and best of luck on your travels look forward to seeing future episodes.

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  40. I always go with what I think is good enough, you talk to one person that went to the south pacific they will say no problem maybe they hit a storm WOW 20 knot winds made it no problem ! now another leaves same trip and two days out they hit 40-50 knot winds last three days, If not alone someone sea sick for all three maybe loose a mast what ever. they could hit several storms like that, look at what happened with the fastnet race in (79 I think) there's a lot of sailboats that I wouldn't want to be out in the middle of the ocean with, that have gone and made it. I always think of the worse and plan for it! mother nature isn't always nice. look at how many times you hear of a boat's windows breaking with big windows to see out of there goes the boat down.

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  41. you can have the badass boat there is !!! but if the captain has not the training to make good judement calls !! well all i can say is good lucky too ya !!! lots to learn , i will be watching , all the best in your venture !!

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