Sailing Yacht

21 comments

  1. Very useful and informative video, thank you.

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  2. Very helpful. Thank you.

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  3. Great, didnt waste time

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  4. Force on boat and direction of travel are reversed.

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  5. Occasionally I see references to the keel having its own 'lift' underwater, similar to lift seen with sails. That seems like a peculiar notion, since lift can only be generated when direction of travel conflicts with where the keel is pointing.

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  6. Great videos! Thanks can you make a video about pilot house vs open ones?

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  7. So when you compare speeds, what kind of metrics are you talking about. Percentage ??? NMPH ??? Can you explain ???? Cheers

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  8. The keel is the backbone of the boat and is built into the boat. All fins are not keels, wile some fins are. Removable fins are not technically the keel in boats that use them. The tiny thin fast fins on lightweight racing boats are also not the keel of the boat.

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  9. great vid thanks

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  10. Very clear thanks

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  11. what do you base your knowledge on? experience, (if so how much) or reading? if so what are your sources please.

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  12. Here are some use cases, What is best? Long range travel, decent weathering of storms, able to navigate reefs, large enough to grow a small veggie plot on board. Basically a "life at sea" boat to serve as home. I feel making my landlubber self seaworthy is the best way to be safe from the trials to lash this world. My wealth can't be seized and my growth not stunted when I'm at sea. My desires satisfied. Indian ocean and SE ASIA islands, Solomon Islands, New Zealand, Vanuatu, Fiji, Australia. Likely place to depart Prince Rupert, BC, Canada set sail for equatorial oceanic climates that are more stable in a changing climate. Also being able to fold down the mast and keel in a fully watertight design(capsize proof) is something Im not even sure exists but would be awesome to have

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  13. What kind of keel too thanks

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  14. I expect to sail in south atlántic frontera of patagonia falklands cae horn and beagle channel alone what kind of sailboat what kind of rigg what kind of keel do you recomiendo me?? Thank you

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  15. i keel you!!!

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  16. Hi,
    I just bought a 24ft allan wight variant (1970'), a New Zealand design. It's a bilge twin keeler. Is it as stable as more traditional keeler (rough seas, strong winds)? Thanks for this great video

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  17. So which keel would be best for ocean crossing and deep blue water sailing?

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  18. My Catalina 18 has a wing keel, and I really love it. Although the boat is small, it sails like a much larger boat. The fin keel gives it lots of stability, while still enhancing performance. The boat hardly heels at all, 30 degrees max, even in a brisk breeze. Another cool thing about the wing keel is that it stabilizes the boat when going through large wakes from passing yachts. When the wave goes to pick the boat up, the wing slows the upward lifting of the boat. Then, on the way back down the back of the wave, the wing keel slows or cushions the fall. I have been hit by some huge yacht wakes, and it always amazes me how stable the boat takes it. Lastly, the draft is only 2.5 feet.

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  19. You did a great job simplifying a complex subject. I learned a lot from this video. Thank you.

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  20. The description says you misspoke @11 min. Dude, you fumbled, bumbled, and misspoke through the whole video.

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  21. Daggerboards move straight up and down. Swing keels "open and close".

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