Sailing Yacht

Check out THIS right before getting a HURRICANE Destroyed BOAT – Episode 38





In this episode you get an in depth seem at the concerns we have been struggling with with our hurricane destroyed catamaran (2012 Lagoon 450). What appears to be rather insignificant area harm turns out to be rotten, damp, balsa main, and it ALL has to come out. You can see the warmth exhaustion and stress kick in as the difficulties get worse and worse. But we will not give up, we will preserve soldiering on, and Parlay will go back in the h2o revived, prepared to sail around the world.

SV Parlay is a hurricane destroyed 2012 Lagoon 450 Catamaran purchased in Tortola, BVI at the starting of 2018. Colin and his friend invested four months acquiring her seaworthy, right before placing sail throughout the Caribbean. Adhere to our journey as we keep on to take care of her and inevitably circumnavigate the globe!

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Edited by Colin

Music:
– www.epidemicsound.com
– youtube audio library

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32 comments

  1. I Think iyts not that bad, just take all the rotten wood out and put a foam in it, like, spray foam and then cut it to size and trim it and then put fiberglass ove rit, done, brand new

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  2. It seems like a fiberglass boat with a wood core that has cracks in the fiberglass you should assume that water has seeped into the core and will need to be fixed. When you figure in your time and material to fix, the hulls and decks that are damaged essentially have no value. The value of the boat is therefore whatever you could sell the rigging, engines, sails, etc.. for. I'm not sure you got a good deal on the boat.

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  3. Dang, bro!!! So sorry for all that damage! I get bummed the more you grind… I am concerned that you aren't using a notched blade to spread the initial resin (to which the balsa is bonded). Use a surf-wax comb after you spread it with the flat blade. It will prevent air pockets and ensure a solid , thorough bond. Using a flat blade encourages air bubbles. A notched blade spreads the resin more uniformly when pressing in the balsa. Oh, and at least put a t-shirt around your face, to prevent breathing in the ground glass; it's really gnarly stuff for your lungs. So, lets see, I think that's all for my know-it-all-ed-ness.

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  4. I don't no if it's to late you should stop doing what your doing
    Find the soft spots drill holes into the voids and inject with epoxy
    Let it set up inject till it won't take any more
    Get it in the water and get rid of it wile you can
    That's what I would do

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  5. We were taught in school that when patching such glassfiber damage the repair area is the damaged area + 10 times the thickness of the wall for it to be approved by insurance. This is europe though.

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  6. Not regretting not doing that job… Awsome, caribia ahead

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  7. We had some water damage at home and didn't know where the water was coming from so we bought a pinless moisture meter that can measure moisture inside a wall without poking holes in it. Should also work to find that wet balsa.

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  8. Parlay Revival, once you discovered the de-lam at 5:12, is there not a way to inject some sort of fibrous/epoxy mix into the void? Just a thought.

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  9. Holy contamination batman

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  10. I would have walked away, and 25 years later I would have been glad I didn't pick that boat.

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  11. no need to watch, bad idea all around

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  12. Definitely went the proper way to completely replace the wood and build a solid hull from the inside out, still I think you could have had decent long lasting results if you tried to inject the affected area with epoxy

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  13. And the hull is dead…. 🙁

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  14. Sandwich is a really big shit boat, sorry for you….

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  15. Wow, this is AMAZING! Side note: I think you are currently in the Rio Dulce? If so lets have a beer sometime!! thanks for the video

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  16. Great work! Did i understand you correctly that old boats (30-40 years old) are made using polyester resin?

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  17. Very impressed. Hats off to your tenacity and skill set. But, how about you get a super short hair cut. You won't look as cool but you will be cooler. 🙂 #tropicalheat

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  18. points at stuff film his face

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  19. so never ever buy a wood core boat NEVER!

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  20. Over the years I restored a number of power boats and sailboats. Painting and sanding the interior from installing a motor and outdrive to gauges etc. Its a lot off work and time consuming. Never so much fiberglass repair like you doing. It will be nice when your finished. A very expensive cat . Good luck , I have thought of buying a storm damaged boat like you but the work is extensive.

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  21. Over the years I restored a number of power boats and sailboats. Painting and sanding the interior from installing a motor and outdrive to gauges etc. Its a lot off work and time consuming. Never so much fiberglass repair like you doing. It will be nice when your finished. A very expensive cat . Good luck , I have thought of buying a storm damaged boat like you but the work is extensive.

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  22. You are fine, there are thousands of boats in that same shape sailing around the ocean currently.

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  23. thats why i prefer steel boats

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  24. How long before you bought that drain did the damage happen.
    Seriously that rot takes time to set in like that.

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  25. Man, oh man. Huge job. Don't stop, just keep going, you're doing a good job.

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  26. I am a Licensed guy in this, what would I do with no large air boards or 8 inch sanders to finish it that would be hell

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  27. I feel for you, I was under my wooden Christ Craft for a long time ,lots of work. Keep on trucking.

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  28. A good coating of baby powders before you start helps so much in keeping the fiberglass itch away. But I'm sure you already knew.

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  29. your opening statement… in reference to in twenty years you will regret it… you can't believe how true that is. I'm 52 now and the dream of going around the world on a sail boat is a dream. I still hope to do it . follow your dreams as long as it's not an incovienance on some one else…. good luck.

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  30. Just a question…. as looking at building our own houseboat… and just looking at methods. Balsa looks nasty, especially if it isn't sealed, or gets any ingress of water. Would the repairs be better to replace with foam core?

    Love the videos mate…. thanks for sharing..

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  31. Dude get yourself a real 3m full face mask. It makes the job a thousand times better. Just tape the hood of your tyvek to it and latex gloves and your glass free.

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  32. Woow wat project Colin 💪💪💪💪😎😎😎⛵⛵⛵❤️❤️❤️

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