Sailing Yacht

Sailing on a boat with big waves





Footage from our household experience to the Channel Islands. When the motor goes out (and swells are pushing our boat into the rocky coastline of Santa Rosa Island) the crew endures a stress filled working day at sea.

resource

46 comments

  1. Is that an H28?

    Reply
  2. I dont buy any of your excuses. Learn to sail. This wheater is sunny weather..

    Reply
  3. The current didnt push you anywhere. With the right skill you decide where the boat is. If you are sailing and you are in p place you dont like or you cant gave the boat in desired position, you schould not be sailing in the first place.

    Reply
  4. Only a imbecile would tow a dinghy like that in those conditions…

    Reply
  5. Bring the dingy on board!

    Reply
  6. Hi Jim. I'm impressed (And encouraged) by your resolve to post this footage, knowing that the armchair admirals will chip in relentlessly with snide comments. Towing a dinghy in large following seas is always a high risk activity. The shock load could well cause the painter (Tow-line) or the attachment points on the dinghy to fail. If you have no alternative (Not enough deck space to hoist the dinghy aboard?), for what it's worth, may I suggest using a dinghy painter that has a very large amount of stretch (e.g. a polyester three-strand line) and is quite long (Say three times the length of the yacht) and think about attaching a small, heavy object on the painter around half way along, say a few 3lb dive weights) so as to introduce a catenary (sag) in the line to help reduce the shock loading. Also lash or lock the outboard in the down position and if possible lash the outboard tiller amidships so the dinghy steers a straight course and the outboard cannot swing side to side. If you can engage the gears so that the propellor doesn't rotate, the extra drag will also help reduce the dinghys tendency to surf past your yacht. Outboard mechanics will say that this is not good for the outboard (Particularly the gearbox) but it is not as bad as losing the whole dinghy due to a parted painter, or attachment points being ripped off… The drag from this set-up will cost you some boat-speed, but same story – you hopefully won't lose the dinghy… In summary, anything you can do to reduce the dinghies surfing and sudden snatching on the painter will lessen the chances of losing the dinghy!
    Also, steering a slightly higher course (i.e. closer to the wind), will hopefully smooth out the boat speed (Increasing your lowest speeds spent in the troughs and decreasing the highest speeds of your occasion surfing down swells) and hopefully reduce the chances of a Chinese (Accidental) gybe. Hope this helps. You're absolutely right when you say that everyone makes mistakes, but what sorts the wheat from the chaff is that intelligent sailors will learn valuable lessons from those mistakes, whilst ignorant sailors will keep repeating them again and again. (Ignorance after all, is simply choosing not to learn something despite the availability of the lesson!)
    Cheers, Mike

    Reply
  7. Kind of rookie stuff there I'm sure you've learned from then you take your motor off and snob up the dink to where it's almost touching the stern. I learned my lesson of the coast of rhode island in a tropical depression it was the fastest I ever went with my dink upside down 3 feet under the water…

    Reply
  8. Thanks for the informative video. It is not always necessary to bring the dink aboard but you remind me how important it can be to get the outboard in long before you need to! Good sailing. "Peter Paris of Germany" is dangerously misled about his 'preventers.' You wouldn't even think of rigging a preventer in this case – in fact – in almost any case. He's also wrong about bringing the dink up unless it's onto the boat, but it's his "preventer" advice that would have you lose a shroud, and the rig. Good work Jim – sail with you any day. You can always tell the landlubbers because they're the know-it-alls… That goes for parenting as well as sailing! You can always tell the single guys by how they tell you how to be a father! LOL

    Reply
  9. Made all these mistakes! That's how you learn! Also plenty world cruisers have baby's on board! Besides seas were OK! I too get sick of these bitter judgemental guys who think they know it all and have forgotten what it was like to learn! There the morons

    Reply
  10. Love the spirit of this video. Mistakes were made but all is well that ends well. Those with the negative comments should perhaps remember when they started out.

    Reply
  11. You did fine. Lessons learned. People below are being way to harsh.

    Reply
  12. A boom gybe preventer/ bowline needs to be rigged in addition to keep the boom in position. Very dangerous to sail without a preventer tackle arrangement! Then of course I strongly recommend to heave the dinghy up to the stern. This is better than let it following the vessel and to wait for the seconds of surfing the waves followed by situations we have seen: The light weight dinghy is faster than the vessel and sails side by side to the vessel surfing down the waves. A serious beginner fault and after some hours usually the towrope breaks and one will loose the dinghy for sure. I am sure there are some comments critisizing this faults. But looking at this video is really spine-crawling! Hope some people read this and learn how to make it better!

    Reply
  13. Do you think it's cute bringing a helpless baby out on angry water? Wise up.

    Reply
  14. people who aren't sailors should stay away from the sea

    Reply
  15. We sailed with a square sail in waves a bit bigger than this. Also in a boat that is under 15m.

    Reply
  16. i love your little dog

    Reply
  17. I think it was not a good idea to have a little child on board!

    Reply
  18. I lost a dinghy doing that the waves where so huge I couldn't turn back to get it I had to watch it float off !

    Reply
  19. One has to get out in it to apprechiate being -in out of it!

    Reply
  20. 2 things. There was a time in the video when the Dinghy should have been hauled in right up to the stern/transom with it bow OUT of the water-and rthis has always served me well not only in sailing -but in life in general -"The time to reef, is when you first think about it!   happy sailing!

    Reply
  21. Training should be made compulsory before allowing anyone to take a boat to sea, the lack of basic seamanship shown here is astounding. You need to do your learning in a classroom before putting yourself in danger like that! 

    Reply
  22. nice video but it would be better to stow the dinghy aboard to avoid friction not to reduce the speed of the boat..

    Reply
  23. Love the comments but please be kind to the poor 'candy-asses' alone as you posted the video and asked for comments, and as you say, you are on the water. I am sure you have great skills now and experience is a great teacher. The trick is keeping down the cost of that experience. I really like the video as it shows how a number of issues can come together to put a few grey hairs on the skipper in a short time. Having taken lots of video at sea, I know the sea state is usually rougher than it looks on video. I always found that the best way to deal with rough conditions is train the crew in them so they get confident.  We sail on the east coast of Australia so conditions blowing up (similar to what you show) is relatively common and that's when inexperienced crew and visitors can have issues of sea-sickness, no sea-legs etc. We do get much rougher too at times.
    As I see it, it is a matter of working on the key problems in the safest way possible. I wouldn't have worried about the engine as the skipper is better being on deck to manage the yacht, ensuring the right course is being held. I would deal with the engine when in calmer waters if possible. If I got into shallow waters on a lee shore I couldn't tack out of, I would drop the sail and anchor but better to stay clear if you can. Sounds like you did that ok. I know how easy it is for a helmsman to go off-course in following seas and wind on the beam. I had tan engine failure (clogged impeller) happen to me in the Whitsundays in a narrow channel, no sail up and a large summer storm fast approaching. On that day, I had only my wife and three teenage daughters on board; all without much experience at the time. We set sail under reef for the nearest protected bay.  I don't know your area and it was not clear from the video but I take it you were drifting to leeward heading for a rocky point. I would have hauled the dinghy in to keep it close to the stern. I have seen a dinghy in this situation flip over, and with the motor down, it could flip more easily, and then the painter could have snapped and you have found it difficult to recover the dinghy, or damage the motor or dinghy.   I agree with the comments re: clipping on but the sea state was not that bad but always a worthwhile precaution especially when children are on board. I would have asked those standing to sit down and hold on particularly as weather-helm/course correction can cause yawing and crew can lose their balance if standing. A good way to cover yourself and your duty of care as skipper and help with insurance premiums is to take accredited courses. I did a range including navigation and Yachtmaster Offshore instructor.
    Cheers
    Michael

    Reply
  24. Well done you did well but the dingy should have been on a bridle and believe me those were not big seas. check out Portland, UK for big seas. Happy sailing

    Reply
  25. What? Those were tiny. 

    Reply
  26. Towing a dinghy is a pain, but unless you have a very large boat, it is impractical if not impossible to bring it on board and stow it properly out of the way.

    Reply
  27. always take the time and stow the dingy aboard. do not choose convenience or laziness over safety.

    Reply
  28. Looks like a normal ocean for us in Australia I use a single line to our dingy I see you have bridled it  witch when the dingy rides over the rope it tends to to tow it from the back end and a lot more distance I also have the outboard down but not necessary.

    Reply
  29. Engine+Sails=

    anybody?

    Reply
  30. That was the first time we'd taken the boat out for a reasonable time and distance and it was very good learning experience.  There are some pretty good swells on the back side of Santa Rosa Island due to some shallow areas and add to that, the wind shifts immediately once your clear San Miguel Isl.  That caught me off guard and apparently it catches a lot of people off guard because there are more than 100 known wrecks in the area.  I happened to be down below, working on the engine with a water cooling issue and had someone with only a few days experience on the tiller.  The swells began to increase and when the wind shifted, she didn't know how to ease up the sheet, so the boat spun into the irons and we got a little rocked between the troughs.  She's heavy for her size so without the engine it takes some time to build up momentum.  This is also my first ketch and at the time I was also not used to how the mizzen can completely cancel out the rudder.  I figured it out pretty quickly and got us out of there, but it was a good combination of mess ups that fell in rapid domino order.  In reality, no one even got their feet wet and I did cut the video together to be suspenseful, but it did bother me that I got taken off guard like that.  This is why I posted it — we shouldn't ever be complacent on the water.  That said, the only way to get is experience is to have experience, and this was one we happened to catch on video.  I love all these comments from people who seem to have magically gained expert knowledge without having ever made mistakes themselves.  That's just Bullshit.  Mistakes are when you don't learn or are too arrogant to realize that you too can make them.  The best advice I've seen here was to drop the outboard on the dinghy when in high swells.  I had just raised the outboard about 1/2 hr. earlier because it had caught and was dragging some seaweed and I was tired of clearing it off — a few minutes later, it was another story… I was wishing it was back down but had other immediate things to attend to.  Everything is usually abundantly clear after the experience is over — but it's when you're in the moment, that is where I think you have opportunity to make observations to improve your skills.  I can't name one sailor who I trust who doesn't have some hairy stories from their own f-ups.  Ironically, most of the guys corpses that they scoop out of the water have their pant's unzipped.  (From taking a leak overboard while alone on deck without being tied off.)  The ocean will always catch you the moment you pant's are down so to speak.  The ocean should take down anyone's pride a few notches, or it will certainly take down your boat.  This was a humbling experience a few years back but I am always humbled by the ocean — that is part of its beauty.  Knock on deck, but 6 years later our boat is still afloat, we have a newer engine now, we are better experienced sailors, we haven't had any serious accidents and we still enjoy the ocean on a regular basis with the same dog.  Leaving to go out again tomorrow all you know-it-all candy asses ≈ 😉

    Reply
  31. Well put, "You did some serious sailing." Frankly that's an understatement… Nice handle on the helm…
    ABK

    Reply
  32. shipwreck

    Reply
  33. aint that the truth

    Reply
  34. You are why I love the sailing community. And I totally agree with you on the anonymity thing. Thats why I mistakenly took you for a bay by day sailor.

    Reply
  35. You're right, I am being hostile and for that I apologise, Zac. My bugbear with youtube is that people hide behind anonymity and, from the comfort of their armchair, tell everyone what they are doing wrong. When they get abusive and personal about it (not necessarily you, but some of these comments are vindictive), I get angry. I've had my fill of armchair sailors so I always take them to task! That aside, let's hope these guys DO learn from their mistake and become better sailors.

    Reply
  36. Ok, I stand corrected. Very nice looking boat. You're not a bay by day sailor. So why so hostile then? When you clearly know by looking at this video, these guys are inexperienced. Theyre making stupid mistakes that we can all point out, and they wouldn't be in any danger if they just stayed calm. Look on your video, you're relaxed and just cruising, not freaking out, locking kids in the brig, hand holding your boon, etc. They are playing it off as if they are about to die or something.

    Reply
  37. let me guess, Iowa farmer? let me make sure you got it rite, you should go with them because I don't take fools.

    Reply
  38. Nice clip, when did you record that? Seriously, dude, you don't know who you are talking to. This year we've done India, the Maldives, One and a Half Degree Channel and then across the Indian Ocean to Malaysia. How many miles have you clocked up this year? You might want to look me up before making daft comments, and check out some of our clips including this one when we hand steered 1,300nm after losing our wind pilot and head sail. /watch?v=5mw_okFkkF8. And yes, we still had fun.

    Reply
  39. F5/6? No way, not even close. You sound like one of those bay by day sailors thats never actually had any fun on his boat. I have faith in my equipment and my experience when I go out. I know my boat can heel over 120 degrees and it will self-right. Nervousness leads to mistakes and mistakes lead to danger. As long as you have a cool head, know what your doing and use the appropriate gear, you can make it through just about anything. /watch?v=f14r3tC-Y4E

    Reply
  40. Get yourself an armchair.

    Reply
  41. Been overboard more than a dozen times even though you wear a harness in the cabin… and you call these guys inexperienced? I think I know who'd I'd prefer to go sailing with.

    Reply
  42. Well said.

    Reply
  43. As sailors we are always in danger; by its very nature we are undertaking a dangerous pursuit. Anyone who does not get a bit nervous in 'way worse conditions' (I suspect this clip shows a F5/6, so you're suggesting gale force conditions) has little respect for the sea and no idea of the danger they are putting themselves in, especially in a 25 ft boat. You're either inexperienced, arrogant or just foolish – the sort of sailor I was taught to avoid.

    Reply
  44. I think the problem everyone's having with this video is that they are playing it off as they are in some extreme danger and didnt make any mistakes themselves. They clearly made a few mistakes and the conditions were very acceptable. I've been out on my Lancer 25' in way worse conditions and never got nervous at all. They weren't in any danger, aside from loosing there dingy.

    Reply
  45. Ships like this are designed to go through some pretty extreme conditions, you would be surprised what some people have been through. Most sailboats built from the 70's on have the ability to self-right after 120 degrees, that's the mast in the water. They could have easily heaved to and would have been just fine. Although they really should have brought in the dingy.

    Reply
  46. Did you guys need any sailing qualifications to take this out?

    Reply

Leave a Reply